Runway Report: Christian Dior SS18

It is stimulating and completely necessary that today’s fashion elite take a stand on something other than the need for beautiful clothes – it’s a complicated political landscape we are facing and fashion is the perfect platform of choice to make bold statements and start real dialogue.

No one does this better than Maria Grazia Chiuri. Last season it was all about feminism – “We Should All Be Feminists” – but for S/S 2018 she was inspired by and references historian Linda Nochlin’s 1971 essay on patriarchy’s effect on art. A former art student herself, Sasha Pivovarova, opened the show with a resilient walk down the runway wearing a striped sweater inscribed with the words: Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? Chuiri distributed Nochlin’s text at the show, which goes on to provide the answer to this question.

The collection itself was a departure for traditional Dior in many ways – the flirtatiousness of lady-like suiting was replaced with cheeky, revealing, millennial-approved separates paired with black mesh knee-boots.  At times, it felt like 80’s on repeat, but significantly more rebellious and certainly very scandalous to all those conservative lady Dior fans. There were also 60’s inspired sequined minidresses, mod boots, and Mary Jane shoes, as well as ’70s jumpsuits, collaged jeans, gleaming mini dresses, and a great deal of sheer tulle.  

The collection was presented at the Rodim Museum gardens – where 80,000 pieces of mirror and 7.2 tons of concrete were used to recreate artist Niki de Saint Phalle’s Tarot Garden – which was a fourteen-acre sculpture park built atop Etruscan ruins with the intention to serve as a demonstration that “a woman can work on a monumental scale.”

About the Author

Andrea Mestrovic is a multi-lingual, multi-talented, but modest multi-tasker who has lived on both sides of the Atlantic. Andrea has a sure-footed instinct for discovering magnificent finds all over the globe. You can follow her on twitter @AndreaMestrovic or read all her posts on http://oliviapalermo.com/author/andrea